Dementia with Lewy Bodies


What is Dementia with Lewy Bodies?

Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) is a progressive neurological disorder affecting a person’s thinking abilities, memory and movements.

What are the symptoms of DLB?

DLB presents with progressive impairment in memory and thinking associated with fluctuating alertness and attention, visual hallucinations, and slowing of movement similar to that of Parkinson’s disease.

What causes DLB?

DLB is caused by a malfunction of nerve cells in specific brain regions; those controlling memory and movements. It is caused by an accumulation of alpha-synuclein protein, which accumulates inside nerve cells forming aggregates called Lewy bodies.

What treatment is available for DLB?

The medications used to treat DLB are similar to the ones used to treat other types of dementias, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Sometimes antipsychotic medications need to be used if hallucinations or if other psychotic symptoms are very prominent. In certain instances, medications for Parkinson’s disease might be used to help the movement component of the disease. A very important part of treatment is physical and occupational therapy.

Where can I get help if I have DLB?

Capital Institute for Neurosciences provides a variety of services that are necessary for diagnosing and treating people with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. This includes evaluation by a team of experienced physicians and neuropsychologists. Social workers, physical and occupational therapists are also available if needed.

The information provided on these educational pages is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. And, if experiencing a medical emergency call 9-1-1. 

Last updated 11/2013

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